Seiko Chronograph

The story of the Seiko chronograph properly begins in 1969. A momentous year in watchmaking that finally saw the development of not just one, but three, automatic chronographs. The Calibre 11 movement developed in partnership by a number of brands, but made famous by Heuer. The El Primero was developed by Zenith and Movado, and is still in production today. Alongside these illustrious and famously storied movements, housed in some of the most desirable vintage watches around, the third automatic chronograph released in 1969 seems a little overshadowed, but the Seiko 6139 movement (and its successor, the 6138) are none the less historically significant, and a helluva lot more obtainable than the other two. SEIKO Spring Drive provides the perfect platform for a luxury chronograph, because elapsed time is measured precisely and not to the nearest fraction. With one-second-a-day accuracy, with its 12 hours duration, with its vertical clutch and column wheel for precise button operation, this is one of the world's great chronographs. Assembled by hand, with 416 parts, 50 jewels, 140 oil points and 5 different lubricants, the Spring Drive chronograph has a power reserve of 72 hours, even when the chronograph is in use.

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